Heart-whole

adjective

Definition:
not in love. wholehearted; sincere.

Examples:

… it may be said of him that Cupid hath clapped him o’ the shoulder, but I’ll warrant him heart-whole.William Shakespeare, As You Like It, 1623

“What,” said he, “have I flirted with so many girls in my own way of life, and come away heart-whole, and now to fall in love with a gentlewoman, who would bid her footman show me the door if she knew of my presumption!”Charles Reade, Put Yourself in His Place, 1870

Origin:
Heart-whole came to English in the 1400s from late Middle English.

Source: dictionary.com

Bon mot

noun

Examples:

He was an extrovert and a character,again like his mother, with a knack for tossing off the perfect bon mot. Once at a dinner party, he told his seatmate, “We are all worms. But I do believe that I am a glow-worm.”

Craig Shirley, December 1941: 31 Days That Changed America and Saved the World, 2011

You need not hurry when the object is only to prevent my saying a bon-mot,for there is not the least wit in my nature. I am a very matter of fact,plain spoken being, and may blunder on the borders of a repartee for half an hour together without striking it out.
Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, 1814

Origin:
Bon mot is a borrowing from French,translating literally as “good word.” Theterm entered English in the mid-1700s.

Source: dictionary. com

Hoi polloi

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[HOI puh-loi]

plural noun
the common people; the masses (often preceded by the).

Examples:

“These regions varied from establishment to establishment, but two features were fairly unwavering: that the VIPs be kept separate from the hoi polloi, and that the hoi polloi be able to see them.”
Jennifer Egan, Look at Me, 2001

“‘To her,’ she would say disparagingly of some silly neighbor, ‘the be-all and end-all is to put on a silver fox and go gallivanting with the hoi polloi.’ Not until I got to college and misused the word myself did I learn that what my mother took to mean the elite-perhaps because ‘hoi polloi’ sounded like another of her disdainful expressions for people who put on airs, ‘the hoity-toity’-actually referred to the masses.”
Philip Roth, My Life as a Man, 1974

Origin:
Hoi polloi is borrowed from Greek, where it translates literally as “the many.” It entered English in the early 1800s.

Source: dictionary.com

Joie de vivre

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noun
French. a delight in being alive; keen, carefree enjoyment of living.

Examples:

“It’s this sort of thing that ages a chappie, don’t you know, and makes his youthful joie-de-vivre go a bit groggy at the knees.”
P. G. Wodehouse, The Inimitable Jeeves, 1923

“I simply can’t explain my undying zest for life! There’s just something inside that fills me with joie de vivre, a je-ne-sais-quoi need to carpe-diem!”
Katie Brinkworth, “Living Life to the Fullest,” The New Yorker, May 1, 2014

Origin:
Joie de vivre translates literally from French as “joy of living.” It entered English in the late 1800s.

Source: word of the day by dictionary.com